Police stop power and the digital turn / Politiets makt til å stoppe og den digitale vendingen

Published on 20/04/2020

The police gaze can be defined as the way the police interpret situations, and it is based on their experience-based street knowledge of who should be stopped and checked (Finstad, 2006: 72). The concept was developed to capture how the police’s very special gaze can be regarded as an analytical tool for control and auxiliary practices (Finstad 2000). It looks for what doesn’t fit in. The police gaze is suspicious. What then are the consequences of technology such as tablets and smartphones for the “police gaze” for whom they choose to stop and check on the street? In connection with the increase in information accessible to patrols, Nesteng (2019) has investigated whether information on the tablet has a greater influence on what police officers pay attention to than their own observation of their surroundings. She asks who is stopped by patrols. An indication of this is given by a detail from the fieldwork she conducted in the fall of 2019, which examined the reasons why police officers wanted to check a car. When asked why the officers wanted to check this particular car, the answer was that it was a nice car – a silver Mercedes – and the person driving it was young. In the conversation afterwards, police officers were asked what makes them want to check cars. The answer was gut feeling and the situation at the particular moment. How the person answered when the police started questioning them, also mattered. The officers nevertheless emphasized the usefulness of the tablet, as it enables them to check information in advance. In this particular case, they also got further information about the driver from the police register. When asked if they would still stop the car if no information had appeared about the car or person in the systems, the answer was “no”.

Informants had varying perceptions on whether information in police records takes precedence over “gut feeling” and thus becomes the major influence on officers’ decisions. What they say about the police gaze is that it looks out for the abnormal at all times. They recognize what they refer to as normal walking, normal dress, normal appearance, normal behaviour, normal gestures, normal eyes and normal driving behaviour. All of this means that when abnormality occurs, they react to it immediately, because they know by experience how a drunk driver drives, how an amphetamine-influenced person acts, walks or gesticulates. They recognize a guilty conscience, they say, and can difference between the look in the eyes of someone who’s interested and someone who’s guilty. Informant F says that they now miss a bit more than they used to:

And the other thing is that, where one might have previously relied on the police gaze, what one calls gut feeling and all that […] we probably miss a bit more now than we used to. An example is that … you might be in a patrol car and planning to check a vehicle. You have got the amazing help that is in the iPads and the phone that allows us to search our systems, and find out who owns that car, whether it has been registered as connected with some crime in the past, whether the police have checked it and so on, and then after a quick search through our systems you can find out if it might be worthwhile to check the car and the driver. And so it is history, and quite humdrum history of the vehicle, that becomes decisive for whether to stop the car or not. While previously, perhaps more emphasis was placed on driving behaviour, the driver’s eyes, which road they chose to take, yes, that kind of thing. Though we … very often had good hits anyway, it was very rarely a highly educated professor on the way home from the university that we stopped, put it that way. Some things will probably be … may be a bit missed due to technology. So, although one can be more targeted in a way, and the same will apply to the ANPR technology, we can also miss things. Serious criminals need do nothing but rent a rental car and then they avoid the whole problem, and they do. No, we have to be critical about how we use technology and how we should otherwise, at least to a large extent, rely on our own experience and gut feeling. (Informant F)

So then, having information available on the tablet in advance of, for example, stopping and checking a car will have some impact on practice. As the informant above says: “And so it is history, and quite humdrum history of the vehicle, that becomes decisive for whether the car is stopped or not.” This suggests that the availability of previously recorded information plays a role in assessments. How events are interpreted, and who is stopped or not stopped, when “advance information” is accessed digitally in this way, can therefore be thought to be changing. There are advantages and disadvantages to this. One advantage is that previously registered information can reduce arbitrary control and “over-control”, while a disadvantage is that registered information can strengthen the surveillance of some groups and the stigma they suffer (Gundhus et al., 2019). A recurring theme during interviews and observations conducted by Nesteng is that officers need to achieve a balance in the amount of attention they pay to their tablets. On the one hand, information from tablets is seen as a useful tool when choosing who to stop and check. On the other, virtually all informants acknowledge that the tablet determines much of their focus when on patrol, and that they “should have looked out of the car.” They are fully aware of this, and also realize that they may well stay looking down at the tablet, rather than at what’s around them. This frontline officer says:

No, that is, the driver is looking at the road, and the other police officer is looking down the tablet, so there can be murder just outside the police car without anyone seeing it. I use this example to make a point here, there are varying degrees of it, but some sit with their face down in that tablet too much. And this is natural, because it is there, offering lots of information all the time, so it draws attention to itself, so you have to work to limit how much attention you give it. (Informant I)

Finstad, L. (2000). Politiblikket. Oslo: Pax
Finstad, L. (2006) Politisosiologi. In: L. Finstad and C. Høigård (eds). Straff og rett. Oslo: Pax
Gundhus, H.O.I, Talberg, N. and Wathne, C. (2019). Politiskjønnet under press In: I.M. Sunde og N. Sunde. Det digitale er et hurtigtog! – Vitenskapelige perspektiver på politiarbeid, digitalisering og teknologi. Oslo: Fagbokforlaget.
Nesteng, S. M. (2019). Politipatruljen om tiltak og mål i Nærpolitireformen. En kvalitativ analyse av politibetjenters opplevelser og erfaringer. Oslo: Department of Criminology and Sociology of Law (Master thesis)

 

 

Original language

Politiblikket kan defineres som politiets fortolkningsskjema som anvendes for å tolke situasjoner, og det hviler på politiets erfaringsbaserte gatekunnskap om hvem som skal stoppes og sjekkes (Finstad, 2006:72). Begrepet ble utviklet på bakgrunn av hvordan politiets helt spesielle blikk kan betraktes som et analytisk arbeidsredskap for både kontroll- og hjelpepraksiser (Finstad 2000). Det ser etter det som ikke passer inn. Politiblikket er mistenksomt. Hva gjør så bruk av teknologi som nettbrett og smarttelefon med «politiblikket» og hvem som de velger ut å stoppe og sjekke på gaten?

I forbindelse med at informasjonstilgangen øker for patruljen, har Nesteng (2019) undersøkt hvorvidt informasjonen på nettbrettet har større innflytelse på oppfatningen politibetjentene gjør seg av omgivelsene enn det de observerer. Hvordan påvirker det hvem som kontrolleres under patruljering? En observasjon under feltarbeidet hun har gjennomført høsten 2019, da politibetjentene ønsket å sjekke opp en bil, kan illustrere det. På spørsmål om hvorfor betjentene ønsket å sjekke opp akkurat denne bilen, var svaret at det var en fin bil – en sølv Mercedes, og personen som satt i bilen var ung. I samtalen etterpå ble politibetjentene spurt om hva som gjør at man vil kontrollere biler. Svaret var magefølelse, og situasjonen i akkurat det øyeblikket. Hvordan personen ordla seg når politiet tok kontakt – «har jeg ikke lov å være her eller?» – hadde også betydning. Betjentene trakk likevel frem fordelen ved nettbrettet, som at de kan sjekke informasjonen på forhånd. I dette tilfellet fikk de også mer informasjon om bilføreren i politiregistret. På spørsmål om de fortsatt ville stoppet bilen, dersom det ikke hadde kommet opp noe informasjon om bil eller person i systemene, var svaret «nei».

Hvorvidt informasjon i politiregistre går på bekostning av «magefølelsen» og dermed på betjentenes beslutninger, var det varierende oppfatninger om blant informantene. Slik de selv forteller om politiblikket er at det ser etter det unormale til enhver tid. De kjenner igjen det de omtaler som normal gange, normal klesdrakt, normalt utseende, normal oppførsel, normal gestikulering, normale pupiller og normal kjøreatferd. Alt dette gjør at når det unormale inntreffer så reagerer de på det øyeblikkelig, fordi de har erfaring på hvordan en beruset fører kjører, hvordan en amfetamin-påvirket mann agerer, går eller gestikulerer. De kjenner igjen dårlig samvittighet, forteller de, og det som er nysgjerrige blikk kontra skyldige blikk. Dette sier informant F at de nå glipper litt mer på enn tidligere:

Og det andre er vel det at der man kanskje tidligere stolte på politiblikket, det man kalte for magefølelsen og alt dette her […] det glipper vi nok litt mer på nå enn tidligere. Et eksempel er jo at … du kanskje kjører patrulje og har tenkt å kontrollere et kjøretøy, man har fått det fantastiske hjelpemiddelet som er i i-Paden og telefonen som gjør at vi kan søke opp i systemene våre, hvem som eier den bilen, om den bilen er registrert på noe kriminalitet tidligere, om politiet har kontrollert den og så videre, og så kan man etter en kort undersøkelse via systemene våre finne ut om det kan være interessant og ta en kontroll av bil og fører i det tilfellet. Og så er det altså historikk, og så helt sånn nøktern historikk på kjøretøyet som blir avgjørende for om man stanser bilen eller ikke. Mens man tidligere kanskje la mer vekt på kjøreatferd, blikket til føreren, veivalg vedkommende gjorde, ja, den type ting. Og der vi … veldig ofte hadde gode treff uansett, da det veldig sjeldent var en høyt utdannet professor på vei hjem fra universitetet vi stanset for å si det sånn. Der kommer nok … kan det kanskje glippe litt på grunn av teknologi. Så selv om man på sett og vis kan være mer målrettet, så, og det samme vil gjelde den ANPR-teknologien da, gjør at vi kan glippe. For tunge kriminelle trenger ikke gjøre annet enn å leie seg en leiebil og så har de unngått hele problematikken, og det gjør de. Nei, vi må være vaktsom på hvordan vi bruker teknologien og hvordan vi ellers skal, hvert fall i stor grad stole på vår egen erfaring og magefølelse. (Informant F)

Ved å ha informasjon på nettbrettet tilgjengelig i forkant av at betjentene for eksempel stopper og kontrollerer en bil, vil det derfor i noen grad ha betydning for praksis. Slik informanten over sier: «Og så er det altså historikk, og så helt sånn nøktern historikk på kjøretøyet som blir avgjørende for om man stanser bilen eller ikke». Dette indikerer at hva som er tilgjengelig av tidligere registrert informasjon spiller en rolle for vurderingene. Hvordan tolkninger av hendelser blir, og hvem som stoppes og ikke stoppes, når man har tilgang på «forhåndsinformasjon» digitalt på denne måten, kan derfor tenkes å være i endring. Det finnes fordeler og ulemper ved dette. En fordel er at tidligere registrert informasjon kan redusere vilkårlig kontroll og «overkontroll», en ulempe er at registrert informasjon kan forsterke kontroll av noen grupper og stigmatisering, fordi informasjonen allerede er registrert i politiregistrene (Gundhus mfl., 2019). Et gjentagende tema under intervjuer og observasjoner som Nesteng har gjennomført, er at de må øve på balansere hvor mye oppmerksomhet man gir nettbrettet. På den ene siden blir dermed informasjon fra nettbrett sett på som et godt hjelpemiddel når de skal velge hvem som skal stoppes og kontrolleres. På den andre siden anerkjenner så å si alle informantene at nettbrettet tar mye av fokuset deres ute på patrulje, og at de «burde ha blikket ut av bilen». De er fullt klar over og innser også selv at de fort kan bli sittende å se ned i nettbrettet, i stedet for på omgivelsene rundt. Denne informanten setter det på spissen:

Nei, altså sjåføren ser jo på veien, og piketten ser ned i padden, så det kan jo skje drap rett på utsiden av politibilen uten at noen får med seg det. Nå setter jeg det på spissen da, det er varierende grad av det, men noen sitter med fjeset ned i den padden altfor mye. Og det er jo naturlig, for den er jo der med masse informasjon hele tiden, så den drar jo oppmerksomheten til seg den, så man må jo jobbe med å begrense hvor mye oppmerksomhet man gir den. (Informant I)

Finstad, L. (2000). Politiblikket. Oslo: Pax
Finstad, L. (2006) Politisosiologi. In: L. Finstad and C. Høigård (eds). Straff og rett. Oslo: Pax
Gundhus, H.O.I, Talberg, N. and Wathne, C. (2019). Politiskjønnet under press In: I.M. Sunde og N. Sunde. Det digitale er et hurtigtog! – Vitenskapelige perspektiver på politiarbeid, digitalisering og teknologi. Oslo: Fagbokforlaget.
Nesteng, S. M. (2019). Politipatruljen om tiltak og mål i Nærpolitireformen. En kvalitativ analyse av politibetjenters opplevelser og erfaringer. Oslo: Department of Criminology and Sociology of Law (Master thesis)

 

(Image: https://www.document.no/2017/07/28/politiet-de-er-norske-statsborgere-vi-gir-ikke-mer-informasjon-enn-det/)

Ethnic profiling and justice in Spain

Read previous

The Stops on the Polish Independence Day

Read next

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *